What Is Pueblo Pottery?

What Is Pueblo Pottery?

Pottery is widely used by indigenous cultures around the world. The Pueblo Indians used pottery for practical purposes and to express the unique aspects of their culture. Many pottery artifacts have been discovered by archaeologists who study the smallest of sherds, and handcrafted pieces are still produced by the descendants of native tribes. Pueblo pottery is a beautiful treasure that you can use to… Continue Reading

The Lizard in Native American Culture

The Lizard in Native American Culture

Walking along desert trails, hikers may see small animals scurrying away as they approach. Lizards live in many regions of North America. However, since they are cold-blooded reptiles, the largest number are found in the southern regions where the climate is warm for most of the year. Lizards are especially prevalent in the desert southwest… Continue Reading

Native American Instruments: Historical & Cultural Significance

Native American Instruments: Historical & Cultural Significance

Music has cultural significance for Native Americans; in fact, they often used music for recounting archaeology, history and traditional narratives. As a result, Native American instruments held a special place among most tribes; though they used several different types, some were more commonplace than others. In particular, Native Americans used drums, flutes, and rattles throughout… Continue Reading

Powamuya: The February Bean Dance

Powamuya: The February Bean Dance

Western cultures tend to celebrate major holidays like Christmas and New Year’s, but the Native peoples of America have always had their own traditions during this time of year. In fact, as February approaches the Hopi tradition of Powamuya is nearly ready to start. The English translation generally refers to it as the Bean Dance.… Continue Reading

Paamuya: Hopi Winter Dances

Paamuya: Hopi Winter Dances

As winter begins to set in, the Hopi celebrate the changing seasons with a series of social dances known as the Paamuya. These dances allow them to honor the earth and prepare for the coming winter. Paamuya, which means “wet moon,” begins in January. It follows the winter solstice ritual of Soyal, during which people… Continue Reading