Koshare: The Sacred Clown of the Hopi

Koshare: The Sacred Clown of the Hopi

Koshare is a sacred clown of the Hopi, one that you’re likely to see at Katsina ceremonies. He is one of several clowns, which are sometimes called jesters or tricksters. He is a powerful figure and important to the community. His Appearance A popular image of the clown is a man that has painted himself with wide… Continue Reading

Celebrating Native American Fathers This Father’s Day

Celebrating Native American Fathers This Father’s Day

Despite being both matrilocal and matrilineal, Navajo culture values the contributions of fathers in their children’s lives. In the Hossain and Aziano study, fathers were shown to participate in child-rearing only a few hours a week less than mothers. A child’s father is a strong role model in the development of children of all genders. Even the tradition of uncles being… Continue Reading

Hakitonmuya & The Plaza Dances

Hakitonmuya & The Plaza Dances

As the temperature rises every May, the Hopi tribe celebrates Hakitonmuya, a season that includes plaza dances. These gatherings are among the highlights of the year. The Hopi tribe lives in 12 villages on three mesas (steep hills with flat tops) spread across more than 1.5 million acres in the northeastern part of Arizona. The Hopi… Continue Reading

The Meanings Behind Native American Prayer Fans

The Meanings Behind Native American Prayer Fans

Native American prayer fans are lovely additions to rustic décor, but they also have deep significance in traditional culture. Created in the belief that birds link the physical world to the spiritual one, they are regarded as sacred objects in prayer and healing ceremonies. Prayer fans are crafted according to the location, customs, and tribal beliefs… Continue Reading